This browser is not fully supported by Historic England. Please update your browser to the latest version so that you get the best from our website.

BONHAMS (BLENSTOCK HOUSE)

List Entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.

Name: BONHAMS (BLENSTOCK HOUSE)

List entry Number: 1393599

Location

BONHAMS (BLENSTOCK HOUSE), 7, BLENHEIM STREET

The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County: Greater London Authority

District: City of Westminster

District Type: London Borough

Parish:

National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: II

This record has been generated from an "old county number" (OCN) scheduling record. As these are some of our oldest designation records they do not have all the information held electronically that our modernised records contain. Therefore, the original date of scheduling is not available electronically. The date of scheduling may be noted in our paper records, please contact us for further information.

Date first listed: 15-Dec-2009

Date of most recent amendment: Not applicable to this List entry.

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 507277

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

Blenstock House, at 7 Blenheim Street, is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * eye-catching use of materials on the façade which is clad in buff, yellow and peach faience; * a distinctive and stylish example of Art Deco architecture, with bent glass vertical windows, stair tower, flagpole and rooftop advertising frame; * surviving bronze shop front at ground floor level, relatively rare in London's West End.

History

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Details



1900/0/10460 BLENHEIM STREET 15-DEC-09 7 Bonhams (Blenstock House)

II Offices and showrooms, 1937, by Fuller, Hall and Foulsham. Later alterations which lack special interest.

EXTERIOR: Blenstock House faces the corner of Blenheim and Woodstock Streets and is a steel-framed building with a faience-clad façade, in buff with accents of yellow and peach. The frontage is composed of a curved stair tower to the left and three bay elevation set back to the right. The former has a tall window on its curved edge, this with continuous full-height yellow faience mullions, stone sills, horizontal metal glazing bars and bent glass panes. The latter has a central projecting vertical window, also with bent glass, metal frames and stone sills, flanked by horizontal rectangular windows to each of the three upper floors. There is fluted peach faience edging around both vertical windows, along the parapet and above the fascia. The ground floor retains the original bronze shop windows, one with bent glass, and two entrances, one (to the left) with the original bronze door and terrazzo lobby floor, the other with a modern door. The sill of the shop windows is studded with a series of bronze acorns. The bronze lettering on the ground floor reading 'Sprinkler Stop Valve Inside' is also probably original. The façade is capped by a steel frame to which is affixed (modern) lettering reading 'Bonhams 1793' and a flagpole.

The building is back to back with other buildings facing Haunch of Venison Yard and New Bond Street, and so there are no other public-facing elevations. Those sections to the rear which are visible, overlooking lightwells in this densely-developed part of central London, are plainer than the façade, in pale grey brick with rows of wide metal windows and some original doors to the fire escape. The buildings behind Bonham's main offices at 101 New Bond Street, with which Blenstock House interconnects, are not included in the listing. The floor levels are different, and this should indicate the extent of listing internally; they are shown as separate buildings on OS maps too.

INTERIOR: A small number of original features. Chief of these is the principal stair with its brass handrail and metal horizontal balustrade, both of which terminate in a scroll at the base. Most of the internal doors are modern, though the upper floors retain some originals, but all the window fixtures are 1930s. A second staircase to the rear of the building, also with a metal balustrade, is much plainer than the principal stair. A small section of paint in the lobby of a secondary entrance from Globe Yard indicates that originally the basement was painted in green up to a thick black dado line, and cream above.

HISTORY: This commercial building was the premises of Phillips Auctioneers until the firm was taken over by Bonhams in 2001. Phillips was founded in 1796 by Harry Phillips, a young entrepreneur and former senior clerk to fellow-auctioneer James Christie. Before expanding into 7 Blenheim Street, the firm was based at 72-3 New Bond Street. Phillips held their first auction here in August 1939.

The building, also known as Blenstock House (a flippant merging of Blenheim Street and Woodstock Street, the names of the two streets on which it stands), was speculatively built as a showroom and offices and then leased to Phillips. This area was first developed from 1720 on the land of the 1st Duke of Portland, also Viscount Woodstock, hence the Oxfordshire street names. Other floors of Blenstock House were rented out to other companies from the outset. In 1946 Berker Sportcraft Ltd, sportswear manufacturers, were tenants; by 1951 there were two additional companies: Glendining and Co Ltd, auction rooms, and Fina Petroleum Products Ltd. Phillips gradually expanded into other floors until they occupied the whole building in 1974. In 1989 Blenstock House was interconnected with the rear of other Phillips' premises at 101 New Bond Street and the whole became Bonhams' Auctioneers in 2001.

Fuller, Hall and Foulsham is a little-known practice which designed a small number of Art Deco style buildings. Among those are Ibex House, Minories, City of London of 1937, a Moderne office block faced with black and buff-coloured faience with continuous horizontal window bands (qv).

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION: Blenstock House, at 7 Blenheim Street, is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons: * eye-catching use of materials on the facade which is clad in buff, yellow and peach faience; * a distinctive and stylish example of Art Deco architecture, with bent glass vertical windows, stair tower, flagpole and rooftop advertising banner; * surviving bronze shop front at ground floor level, relatively rare in London's West End.

Selected Sources

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details

National Grid Reference: TQ 28687 81041

Map

Map
© Crown Copyright and database right 2017. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100024900.
© British Crown and SeaZone Solutions Limited 2017. All rights reserved. Licence number 102006.006.
Use of this data is subject to Terms and Conditions.

The above map is for quick reference purposes only and may not be to scale. For a copy of the full scale map, please see the attached PDF - 1393599 .pdf

The PDF will be generated from our live systems and may take a few minutes to download depending on how busy our servers are. We apologise for this delay.

This copy shows the entry on 27-Mar-2017 at 01:28:35.

End of official listing