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List Entry Summary

This building is listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as amended for its special architectural or historic interest.


List entry Number: 1298408



The building may lie within the boundary of more than one authority.

County: Lancashire

District: Lancaster

District Type: District Authority


National Park: Not applicable to this List entry.

Grade: II

Date first listed: 13-Mar-1995

Date of most recent amendment: Not applicable to this List entry.

Legacy System Information

The contents of this record have been generated from a legacy data system.

Legacy System: LBS

UID: 383096

Asset Groupings

This list entry does not comprise part of an Asset Grouping. Asset Groupings are not part of the official record but are added later for information.

List entry Description

Summary of Building

Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.

Reasons for Designation

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Legacy Record - This information may be included in the List Entry Details.



SD4862 CATON ROAD 1685-1/4/64 (West side) Waggon Works (front range and office)


Former waggon works, now office, warehouse, and part of factory. 1863-5. By EG Paley. For the Lancaster Carriage and Waggon Works Company. Roughly coursed rock-faced sandstone with rock-faced and ashlar dressings. Slate roofs. Caton Road front is a long range of single-storey workshops, with fairly regular fenestration, on either side of an entrance gateway which is marked by a tall clock tower and leads to an irregularly-shaped yard. To the right and left of the tower the walls are pierced by tallish windows, although at the far left (in what may have been a boiler house since it is marked by the brick base of a chimney) these windows are separated at regular intervals by small square windows. To the right of the tower and at the far left the roofs have clerestorey ventilation. Old photographs show a row of brick chimneys, now removed, rising from the front wall to the right of the tower between each window, originally serving blacksmiths' hearths. The tower is of 3 stages, with quoins which in the top stages form clasping pilasters. It has a high waggon entrance under a rusticated segmental arch with 4 linked round-headed windows of ashlar above, and a clock face on a slightly projecting panel in the top stage. This motif is repeated on the side elevations. The steep pyramidal roof is topped by a timber bell-chamber with 2 pointed trefoiled openings on each face and a pyramidal roof. The office block, within the courtyard and facing south, is of 2 storeys with a wide central bay between 2 semi-octagonal windows, all under a roof with bracketed eaves. The doorway and ground-floor windows have segmental heads; on the first floor the bay windows have straight heads and the paired windows above the door have round heads. INTERIOR: the office block contains a staircase with cast-iron balustrade. HISTORY: built alongside the Midland Railway Line, the works were finally closed in 1908 and in 1914 were taken over for use as an internment camp for enemy aliens. For a while the officer in charge was Robert Graves, who describes the experience in 'Goodbye to All That'.

Listing NGR: SD4840662941

Selected Sources

Books and journals
Graves, R, Goodbye to All That

National Grid Reference: SD 48406 62941


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